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Hate the Old and Follow the New. Khoekhoe and the Missionaries in Early Nineteenth-Century Namibia

Hate the Old and Follow the New. Khoekhoe and the Missionaries in Early Nineteenth-Century Namibia

Hate the Old and Follow the New is mainly concerned with the social transformations that took place among Khoekhoe in early nineteenth-century southern Namibia.
Dedering, Tilman
13022
978-3-515-06872-7
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Book title: Hate the Old and Follow the New
Subtitle: Khoekhoe and the Missionaries in Early Nineteenth-Century Namibia
Author: Tilman Dedering
Studien der Berliner Gesellschaft für Missionsgeschichte, Band 2
Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag
ISBN 978-3-515-06872-7
Stuttgart, 1997
Hardcover, 205 pages, 17x25 cm


From the preface:

This book is mainly concerned with the social transformations that took place among Khoekhoe in early nineteenth-century southern Namibia. This period marks a crucial phase of transition when African groups along the Orange River underwent economic and social changes that considerably reshaped 'traditional' patterns. lt has been justly claimed that South African historiography neglected the history of the Cape's northem frontier for a long time.

The scholarly indifference to an apparently unimportant region reflected the contemporary view of colonial administrators. John Philip, Superintendent of the London Missionary Society, indicated in 1836 that the term 'frontier' had become predominantly associated with the eastern frontier.

The attention of the colonial government in South Africa in the nineteenth century and, at a later stage, of historians concentrated mainly on the confrontation between white colonists and Xhosa in the region between the Sundays and the Kei Rivers. The history of the Cape north-western frontier, however, has probably been treated with an even greater degree of negligence. […]