Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species, by Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown and Jessica Kemper

Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species, by Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown and Jessica Kemper. Ministry of Environment and Tourism and Namibia Nature Foundation Windhoek, Namibia 2015. ISBN 9789994500826 / ISBN 978-9-9945-0082-6

Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species, by Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown and Jessica Kemper. Ministry of Environment and Tourism and Namibia Nature Foundation Windhoek, Namibia 2015. ISBN 9789994500826 / ISBN 978-9-9945-0082-6

Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species, by Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown and Jessica Kemper with contributions from D. Boyer, H. Boaby, S. J. Braby, A. Leseberg, T. O. Osborne, J. R. Pallett, J. P. Roux, H. A. Scott.

Authors of Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species

As Namibia's state ornithologist (1990-2003) Dr. Rob Simmons focussed on Namibia's endemic birds, flamingos, wetland and coastal birds. He also headed the Wetlands Working Group and Mountain Ecosystem Group before moving to Universtity of Cape Town UCT in 2003. His long-term harrier research resulted in Harriers of the World, published in 2000. He currently tracks Black Harrier migrations, studies climate change effects on vulture foraging and initiated Africa's first study of the impact of domestic cats on faunal diversity in 2010. Studying as far afield as Sweden and Papua New Guinea, he's published more than 100 papers, contributed to nine books, and written 70 popular articles. He mixes environmental consultancy work on renewable energy with student supervision and research in Cape Town with his partner and daughters.

Dr. Christopher J. Brown did his doctoral thesis on the Bearded Vulture in the Drakensberg and Lesotho highlands. In 1983 he took the post of Ornithologist in the then Department of Nature Conservation. In 1992 he was the first Head of the Directorate of Environmental Affairs in the Ministry of Environment & Tourism. He led the development and implementation of many national environmental policies and programmes including Namibia's first bird atlas project, Namibia's Green Plan, Namibia's community-based natural resource management programme, Namibia's programme to combat desertification and Namibia's national biodiversity programme. In 1998 he became the Executive Director of the Namibia Nature Foundation, retiring from this position in 2012. He was the editor of the journal Madoqua for 10 years and has published over 100 papers.

Dr. Jessica Kemper grew up on five continents and ended up in Namibia in 1999, initially for a few weeks to monitor seabirds on far-flung Mercury Island. This memorable experience ultimately resulted in her doctoral thesis on the demography of African Penguins in Namibia. Her research and engagement have been instrumental during the process of proclaiming Namibia's first marine protected area and she continues to be passionately involved in the conservation of Namibia's coastal birds. When she is not counting seabirds, washing oiled penguins or editing manuscripts, she can be found exploring the Lüderitz Peninsula with her dogs, photographically recording its fascinating flora and fauna.

This is an excerpt from Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species, by Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown and Jessica Kemper.

Title: Birds to Watch in Namibia
Subtitle: Red, Rare and Endemic Species
Authors: Rob Simmons, Christopher J. Brown; Jessica Kemper
Publishers: Ministry of Environment and Tourism and Namibia Nature Foundation Windhoek, Namibia 2015
ISBN 9789994500826 / ISBN 978-9-9945-0082-6
Softcover, 21 x 28 cm, 320 pages, throughout colour photos

Simmons, Rob und Brown, Christopher J. und Kemper, Jessica im Namibiana-Buchangebot

Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species

Birds to Watch in Namibia: Red, Rare and Endemic Species

Birds to Watch in Namibia is the first guide detailing all of Namibia’s threatened (red), endemic and rare species of birds.